Recommended Read: Rubicon by Ian Patrick

BRIT GRIT, Crime Fiction, Fahrenheit 13, Fahrenheit Press, Ian Patrick, Paul D Brazill, recommended reads, True Brit Grit On The Box

 

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Wild card Sam Batford  is an undercover cop who has infiltrated crime kingpin Vincent Guardino’s organisation. DCI Klara Winter  is also hell-bent on bringing down Guardino but in a much more by-the-book way. The two investigations inevitably collide and clash in Ian Patrick‘s marvellously gripping debut novel Rubicon. Cracking stuff!

Recommended Read: Broken Dreams by Nick Quantrill

BRIT GRIT, Crime Fiction, Fahrenheit Press, Hull, Hull Noir, Nick Quantrill, P I, Paul D Brazill, punk fiction, recommended reads

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Nick Quantrill’s Broken Dreams is a cracking book. It’s the story of a Private Investigator following a muddy and bloodstained trail through a battle scarred Northern city. PI Joe Geraghty- like his hometown Hull-  has both taken many a good kicking and is trying to get back on his feet. Broken Dreams is realistic and romantic – in a Joe Strummer way.  It takes you by the lapels and drags you along on a gritty, griping journey. Recentley rebooted by Fahrenheit Press, Nick Quantrill‘s debut novel is highly recommended.

Short, Sharp Interview: David Nolan

BRIT GRIT, David Nolan, Fahrenheit Press, Manchester, Paul D Brazill, Post Punk, Punk, short sharp interviews

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PDB: What’s going on?

I’m just recovering from the shock of my first novel being published. I still struggle saying the N Word… novel. It sounds so weird. Author is quite utilitarian but novelist still sounds suspect to me. This is the bit where I plug the book, right? It’s called Black Moss and it’s set in Manchester in 1990 during the Strangeways prison riot. It’s very sweary and unpleasant. It’s not knowing, there are no winks to the audience. It’s just unpleasant.

PDB: Do you listen to music when you work?

Yes. I like noise. I spent most of my working life in newsrooms with clattering typewriters, three TVs on and people screaming at each other. So yes, always music helps fill the silence: bit of punk, bit of electronica, bit of power pop, bit of reggae. Nearly all my previous books are music-related (I Swear I Was There, Tony Wilson, Damon Albarn) so I have an endless capacity for music.

PDB: What makes you laugh?

My daughter is 15 and she’s very funny. She calls me chief. Or Dave. Neither of which I like. Actually, she’s not funny, she’s annoying.

PDB: What’s the best cure for a hangover?

Being teetotal. Like me. And then being very smug about it. Like me.

PDB: If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?

The far north of Scotland. Which is where I’m planning to move in a couple of years. I’d prefer to live on an island on a loch on an island that is impossible to get to, but I suspect I won’t manage to sell that idea to my wife (who’s Scottish). So a nice seaside village is more likely.

PDB: Do you have a bucket list? If so, what’s on it?

Nope. I’ve led a charmed life. Honestly, if I died tomorrow I’d be happy with what I’ve done.

PDB: What’s on the cards?

I’m doing quite a few radio interviews this week about the book. It’s set in a radio station, so that’ll be a bit weird. They’ll ask me if the characters are based on real people. I’ll say no. Which will be a lie.

PDB: Anything else?

Yes. Buy my book and I promise I’ll write another one.

nolanBio: David Nolan is a multi award-winning author, television producer and crime reporter. He has written a dozen books including Tell the Truth and Shame the Devil, the true story of the largest historic abuse case ever mounted by Greater Manchester Police.

He presented a BBC Radio 4 documentary based on the book called The Abuse Trial. It won both the Rose D’Or and the New York International radio awards in 2016.

Officers involved in the case helped David with the police procedures featured in Black Moss, particularly the way the system deals with missing children.

Recommended Read: Dread: The Art Of Serial Killing by Mark Ramsden

BRIT GRIT, Fahrenheit 13, Fahrenheit Press, London, Mark Ramsden, Paul D Brazill, recommended reads

Dread the art of serial killingDickens obsessive Mr. Madden is a spy whose mission is to infiltrate the right wing group England Awake!

He is also a serial killer known as The Chavkiller who is out to revenge his dead wife.

Dread: The Art Of Serial Killing by Mark Ramsden is violent, gripping, clever, touching and very, very funny.

The wordplay is witty and the structure is remarkably inventive.

Cultural references abound – high-brow, low-brow -and any book that mentions both Tony Hancock and Frankie Howerd is fine by me.

A belter!

Recommended Read: A Mint Condition Corpse by Duncan MacMaster

Crime Fiction, Duncan MacMaster, Fahrenheit Press, Humour, Paul D Brazill, recommended reads

a mint condition corpseComic book artist, part-time sleuth and multi-millionare Kirby Baxter arrives at a Canadian comic book convention intending to catch up with old friends but he is very quickly caught up in a murder investigation.

Duncan MacMaster’s A Mint Condition Corpse is a joy. Fast-moving, funny and choc-full of great characters, observations and dialogue.

Highly recommended.

Kill Me Quick is BACK TO LIFE!

BRIT GRIT, Chris Black, Christopher Black, Fahrenheit 13, Fahrenheit Press, Kill Me Quick!, Music, number 13 press, Number Thirteen Press, Paul D Brazill, seaside noir, Seatown

Kill me quick new

My seaside noir KILL ME QUICK has been rebooted and suited by the folks at Fahrenheit 13 and Farhrenheit Press, and you can pick it up at a discount price if you buy it direct from the publishers.

The eBook is less than a quid and the paperback is less than a fiver!

Can’t fall off!

Get the eBook here and the paperback here.

Or you can grab it from the Amazons, if you’re that way inclined.

‘We’re all lying in the gutter, but some of us are staring at the spaces between the stars… 

Seatown may not have a lot going for it – apart from the Roy Orbison lookalikes and Super Seventies Special every Thursday night, of course – but it is at least the place Mark Hammonds calls home. And after a decade away, it’s the place he returns to when he has nowhere else to go.

From dead bikers to dodgy drug deals, from one downbeat bar to another, from strippers to gangsters and back again: the luckless former musician bounces from one misdeed to the next along with a litany of old acquaintances, almost as though he never left. And if only he can shake off everybody who wants to kill, maim or otherwise hurt him, maybe he could even think about staying.

After all, there’s no place like home, eh?

“Gritty, fast-paced and hilarious. The dialogue is full of sharp one liners and insightful asides, and the characters are all larger than life. An absurd story told with such finesse that even the most over-the-top scenes feel real. My guess is you’ll read it in one sitting.” – SW Lauden (author of Bad Citizen Corporation andCrosswise)

“Dark and delicious… With ‘Kill Me Quick!’ the author has provided yet another delicious plate of cool cynicism, peppered with spicy dialogue and an inky black-humour sauce. Paul D. Brazill’s Seatown backdrop is luridly drawn; the characters are a blend of hopeless, scary and hilarious, while the verbal exchanges are as sharp and dry as glass of Northumberland moonshine on the rocks. The gritty darkness of the north-east has never been so much fun. Fabulous.” – Dominic Milne (author of Act of Contrition)

“Fahrenheit 13 have done an excellent job in assembling top quality novellas in this series and Paul Brazill’s offering is no exception. They say home is where the heart is….if you’re a character in a novella by Paul D. Brazill that heart will probably soon be removed and by a gangster with vicious intent! As always with this author’s stories it’s entertaining, witty and always a fun read. A great crime caper that is a steal at the price. Five stars.” – Darren Sant (author of Dark Voices and various Radgepacket tales from the legendary Byker Books)

“A smart and insane ride through the underbelly of crime. Told with his characteristic punch, this is as gritty and as hard boiled as it gets and Brazill is a master at it. By turn humorous and captivating this will keep you guessing. A Noir novel textured with local culture and razor sharp dialogue. Highly Recommended.” – Richard Godwin (author of Wrong Crowd and Confessions of a Hitman)

“This novella is a crazy crime jukebox that takes in everything from crooners to croakers without missing a beat…. Get it. If you have anything like a sense of humour and a heart as black as the inside of a body bag, you’ll love it. Besides, best corpse disposal trick ever.” – Graham Wynd (author of Extricate and Satan’s Sorority)

“The story winds tight as Hammond’s life unravels. Brazill uses his trademark wordplay and humour to add extra layers to the experience and manages to draw out laughs from the most uncomfortable situations. There’s also a vast soundtrack…. If I were to select a song to sum up this novella, Sex and Drugs and Rock and Roll would be my pick and, if they’re elements you enjoy in your noir, this is the book for you. Terrific fun.” – Nigel Bird (author of Southsiders and Dirty Old Town & Other Stories)

“An oddball crime book with pitch black humor and wordplay while the out of luck lowlifes run from one unlucky event to the next. Everything is delivered with that dry kind of understatement only the Brits have mastered… where even the strangest situations are funny even they are not funny at all.” – Miranda (booklikes.com)’

I’m Interviewed by Mark Ramsden

All Due Respect, BRIT GRIT, BRIT NOIR, comics, Down and Out Books, Fahrenheit 13, Fahrenheit Press, Mark Ramsden, Music, Near To The Knuckle, Paul D Brazill, Reviews

SMC

Ace transgressive fiction  writer Mark Ramsden has some nice things to say about my writing and then we have a little natter:

‘In the mid 20th century there were light-hearted crime novels about decent chaps with a taste for adventure. The Saint. The Toff. Perhaps, like Paul Temple, they had a cockney manservant and lived in Mayfair. Mr Brazill’s comedic capers are generally set somewhere less salubrious. Perhaps a grim seaside town, where laconic losers drink super strength lager, which might be stored in their pockets for later – not much later at all.

Instead of a search for the Maltese Falcon a vile gangster wants to know which of his girls are offering, against his wishes, a ‘full service’.
The one liners come thick and fast. ‘”I’m as honest as the day is long”. If you live in Iceland.’
‘The silence dragged like a BNP voter’s knuckles.’
There’s nifty descriptions: ‘He had salt and pepper hair that erred on the side of Saxa, and his face had that scrubbed-by-a-Brillo Pad look favoured by football mangers like Sir Alex Ferguson.’
It’s realistically sleazy and gritty but with enough humour so you don’t need to drown your sorrows – unlike Paul’s protagonists.
Like his Too Many Crooks there’s a sly metafictional flavour but it’s gentle and playful. It won’t strip the enamel off your teeth, like some of the beverages consumed herein.
In short, an original homebrew with a kick. Well worth sampling.

MR  Your earliest influence, writers you most admire? 

PB   Well, I wasn’t a book person as a kid so the first writers I noticed were comic writers like Stan Lee, Steve Gerber, and music writers like Jane Suck and Paul Morley. Monty Smith’s film stuff for the New Musical Express was essential reading. After that, the ‘grown up’ books were by Dorothy Parker, Graham Greene, Kurt Vonnegut and Elmore Leonard – the latter due to an NME article by Charles Shaar Murray.’

Read the rest here.

Recommended Read: When The Music’s Over by Aidan Thorn

Aidan Thorn, BRIT GRIT, Crime Fiction, Fahrenheit 13, Fahrenheit Press, number 13 press, Number Thirteen Press, Paul D Brazill, recommended reads

when the music's over

Revenge is bittersweet for failed musician Benny Gower.

Gower murders Birmingham drug-dealer Harry Weir and goes on the run.

Retired enforcer Wynn McDonald is reluctantly sent to track down Gower.

What ensues is a lethal cocktail of hardboiled crime fiction as well as a touching study of regret and disappointment. The action is brutal, the characters are vividly drawn, the pacing is gripping.

Aidan Thorn’s When The Music’s Over is a powerful slice of Brit Grit crime fiction that is highly recommended.

Recommended Read: A Citizen Of Nowhere by Seth Lynch

Crime Fiction, Fahrenheit Press, noir, Paul D Brazill, Seth Lynch

a citizen of nowhereSeth Lynch’s cracking debut novel has recently been republished by Farhenheit Press  and  has been given a new title, as well as a tasty new cover.

A CITIZEN OF NOWHERE is part historical detective story and part character study reminiscent of Maugham’s The Razor’s Edge,

It is richly cinematic and completely enthralling, with a great sense of time and place, as well as a great deal of wry humour.

Recommended Read: Kiss The Devil Goodnight by Jonathan Woods

Crime Fiction, Fahrenheit Press, Farenheit Press, Jonathan Woods, Paul D Brazill, pulp, pulp fiction, recommended reads

kiss the devil goodnightBill Derringer is an Iraq war veteran who is having trouble making ends meet. When he and his wife Edie take their two kids to visit Edie’s Aunt Ida, she turns out to be a lot more than Bill had bargained for and things soon spiral wildly out of control.

Jonathan Woods’ ‘Kiss The Devil Goodnight‘ is a lethal cocktail of pulp fiction and Beat poetry. It’s vibrant, violent and vivid. Lyrical and and lurid. Fast moving and funny. ‘Kiss The Devil Goodnight’ is chock-full of great lines and powerful imagery, and is certainly not for those of a delicate sensibility. I loved it.

Here Comes Fahrenheit 13!

BRIT GRIT, Chris McVeigh, Fahrenheit 13, Fahrenheit Press, Kill Me Quick!, number 13 press, Number Thirteen Press, Paul D Brazill, Writing

Fahrenheit Press

As of February 2018, Number Thirteen Press has joined with Fahrenheit Press to form a new imprint:

Fahrenheit 13

Fahrenheit Press’ Chris McVeigh dishes the dirt here:

‘We’re delighted to announce that Number Thirteen Press has officially become part of the Fahrenheit family.  We’re massively chuffed that as part of the deal, Number Thirteen head honcho Chris Black has agreed to join us as senior editor of our new imprint Fahrenheit 13. Over the coming months we’ll be republishing the Number Thirteen books and Chris will be out in the world actively commissioning new books for our new imprint. As a nod to Number Thirteen tradition, all the books published by Fahrenheit 13 will be published on the 13th of the month.’

And Number Thirteen Press’ Chris Black spills the beans here. 

‘So, here I am, the new head of a new imprint and it’s important to me that Fahrenheit 13has a distinctive feel. So if Fahrenheit are the punk publishers of crime fiction, where does that leave Fahrenheit 13?

Simple: Fahrenheit only break the rules. Fahrenheit 13 burns the rule book and buries it out in the desert.’

All of which is great news for me, as it means my seaside noir Kill Me Quick! will be rebooted and suited and should be republished around May or June.

Tidy!