Recommended Read: British ’60s Cinema by Paul Thompson

Paul Thompson’s BRITISH 60s CINEMA website is a gem. Don’t take my word for it, the great Cathi Unsworth is a fan, too. Here’s  the SP: ‘This website will celebrate the vitalilty and variety of British cinema in the 1960s (whilst straying back into the 1950s and on into the 1970s, and sometimes just covering interestingContinue reading “Recommended Read: British ’60s Cinema by Paul Thompson”

Recommended Read: In A Lonely Place by Dorothy B. Hughes

Dixon Steele wanders through misty post-war Los Angeles as a serial killer stalks the city. Steele himself sees the world through a dense fog that hides dark secrets, repressed memories and more. Dorothy B. Hughes’ In A Lonely Place (1950) has atmosphere in spades and is well deserved of its classic status. Here’s the blurb:Continue reading “Recommended Read: In A Lonely Place by Dorothy B. Hughes”

Guest Blog: Revisiting: SHADOW OF A DOUBT by K A Laity

Though it’s fallen out of fashion a wee bit, Hitchcock seemed to always consider this film his finest and people as wildly varying in their opinions as David Mamet and the baying jackals, er, critics of Rotten Tomatoes agree. Shadow of a Doubt offers a gripping tale with gruesome undertones. It’s a genuine snapshot ofContinue reading “Guest Blog: Revisiting: SHADOW OF A DOUBT by K A Laity”

Short, Sharp Interview: John Grant

PDB: Can you pitch A Comprehensive Encyclopedia of Film Noir: The Definitive Reference Guide in 25 words or less? Nope. I can’t. I’ve tried and I’ve tried and I’ve . . . But I’ll see if I can at least keep this short. My latest book, published in October, is called A Comprehensive Encyclopedia of Film Noir: TheContinue reading “Short, Sharp Interview: John Grant”

Guest Blog: Bernard Herrmann: That Sinking Feeling by Richard C. Walls

Bernard Herrmann was the first great modernist film scorer . During a period (’40s and ’50s”) when the form was dominated by devisers of late-Romantic pastiches and slight variations on established emotional cues, Herrmann forged his own filmic language, one which depended as much on its internal voicing as it did on its melodic liltContinue reading “Guest Blog: Bernard Herrmann: That Sinking Feeling by Richard C. Walls”