Short, Sharp Interview: Graham Wynd

BRIT GRIT, Drag Noir, Exiles, Fox Spirit, Graham Wynd, K A Laity, noir, short sharp interviews

missing-monarchs3-72PDB: What’s going on now?

I have a story ‘Headless in Bury’ in the new Fox Spirit anthology Missing Monarchs. It sets a PI named Wolf on the trail of the head of a long-dead King, St Edmund. There’s a bunch of great folks in this collection including Jo Thomas, Geraldine Clark Hellary and the always hilarious and blisteringly profane Chloë Yates. I also have a fun little tale about obsession over at Pulp Metal Magazine “30 Versions of Warm Leatherette” which is based on a true story. Well, only so far as my pal Marko gave me 30 versions of “Warm Leatherette” though on CD because he’s old school.

PDB: How did you research this book?

For once, I did: I used some of my medieval background because the story of St Edmund (as in the town of Bury St Edmunds) has him getting captured and killed by Vikings, who knock his head off. A wolf guards it until the monks can find him when the  head calls them over saying “Here, here, here!” Or in the Latin, hic hic hic which sounds much better of course.

PDB: Which of your publications are you most proud of?

Right now I’d say the Fox Spirit novella collection Extricate & Throw the Bones which also includes a bunch of shorts. I think it’s where I first really found my noir stride and I’m really pleased with both those novellas and most of the stories, one of which Otto Penzler picked our of the blue to be in Kwik Krimes. It was my nod to Tony Hancock and Sid James so I’m chuffed (“Losing My Religion”).

PDB: What’s your favourite film/ book/ song/ television programme?

Oh, I can never choose. I’m having the worst time choosing things for the crime course I’m teaching in the spring. It’s impossible making up my mind, so I finally told myself I just have to be a gateway drug: Chandler, Hammett, Sanxay Holding, Hughes, Cain, Highsmith, Millar, Himes, Thompson. Films I’m using—I had to cut down to three!—Third Man, Out of the Past, Night of the Hunter unless I change my mind and do one of the books after all (probably Maltese Falcon or Strangers on a Train). Television I’m behind on everything. Caught up on the first four seasons of Justified earlier this year and loved it. Oh and so excited about a third series of The Bridge because Saga is my hero.

extricate ebook 72ppiPDB: Is location important to your writing?

Yeah, but it’s also a drawback because most of my stories are set in the UK but I’m not actually British so I’m not a British writer and US readers aren’t interested in British settings unless they’re cosies and I don’t do cosy.

PDB: How often do you check your Amazon rankings?

Never—what’s the point? If it’s ever good news it’ll show up in my bank account. Otherwise it’s just depressing. There’s always somebody doing better than you.

PDB: What’s next?

I’m working on a new novel that’s noir in the vein of James M. Cain, rather than detective sort of stuff. People who get obsessed and then go too far because they can’t just walk away from a bad situation. And a dog. I said I wasn’t going to do any more stories with dogs in them, but maybe I lied. Or maybe I just don’t learn.

Bio: A writer of bleakly noirish tales with a bit of grim humour, Graham Wynd can be found in Dundee but would prefer you didn’t come looking. An English professor by day, Wynd grinds out darkly noir prose between trips to the local pub. The novella of murder and obsessive love, EXTRICATE is out now from Fox Spirit Books; the print edition also includes the novella THROW THE BONES and a collection of short stories. ‘Headless in Bury’ appears in the MISSING MONARCHS Fox Pockets anthology, ‘The Tender Trap’ appears in EXILES: AN OUTSIDER ANTHOLOGY from Blackwitch Press, and the short story ‘Kiss Like a Fist’ appears in NOIR NATION 3.

CLIP: A Bit Of A Pickle by Paul D. Brazill

ANTHOLOGY, CLIP, Drag Noir, K A Laity, Short Story

drag noir 2‘The ghost of a Petula Clark song drifted into The Bag O’ Nails through a partly open window. A shard of sunlight sliced through the blinds, picking out specks of dust that floated in the air. An old electric kettle boiled in another room. A refrigerator hummed. A dishwasher chugged dully. A mangy black and white cat strolled across the newly polished bar before curling up on a wooden bar stool and going to sleep.’

To read the rest of A BIT OF A PICKLE you should pick up a copy of DRAG NOIR.

‘DRAG NOIR: this is where glamour meets grit, where everyone’s wearing a disguise (whether they know it or not) and knowing the players takes a lot more than simply reading the score cards. Maybe everyone’s got something to hide, but they’ve got something to reveal, too. Scratch the surface and explore what secrets lie beneath — it’s bound to cost someone…a lot.

Here are the stories in Drag Noir, suitably wrapped in a stylish cover from S. L. Johnson:

Introduction by Dana Gravesen and Bryan Asbury , The Meaning of Skin – Richard Godwin , Wheel Man – Tess Makovesky , No. 21: Gabriella Merlo – Ben Solomon , Geezer Dyke – Becky Thacker , Lucky in Cards – Jack Bates , Trespassing – Michael S. Chong , Chianti – Selene MacLeod , The Changeling – Tracy Fahey , Straight Baby – Redfern Jon Barrett , Kiki Le Shade – Chloe Yates , Protect Her – Walter Conley , King Bitch – James Bennett , A Bit of a Pickle – Paul D. Brazill , Stainless Steel – Amelia Mangan , The Itch of the Iron, The Pull of the Moon – Carol Borden.’

Bits n Bobs: News, Updates etc

brit grit alley, Caffeine Nights, Graham Smith, Guns Of Brixton, K A Laity, Out Of The Gutter, Spelk Fiction, Spinetingler Magazine

Guns_cover new preview (2)Bits n Bobs:

The Drag Noir anthology – edited by K A Laity and published by Fox Spirit – is out now and over here you can find out what inspired my yarn ‘A Bit Of A Pickle’ … My new Brit Grit Alley column is live at Out Of the Gutter Online and includes news of a HOT Crime Fiction writing course organised by Graham Smith … I’ve had a couple of yarns accepted recently. The new flash fiction site Spelk Fiction have accepted my piece The Long Haul. It should be published at the end of December. The deservedly well-respected Spinetingler Magazine have accepted my story The Postman Cometh. It should be online early next year … and my comic crime caper Guns Of Brixton (soon to be published in paperback by Caffeine Nights Publishing) appears to be available for pre-order from loads of places including Waterstones, Foyles Amazon and Amazon UK.

Drag Noir Is Out Now!

ANTHOLOGY, K A Laity, noir

drag noirEdited by K A Laity and includes my yarn ‘A Bit Of A Pickle.’

Here’s the skinny:

DRAG NOIR: this is where glamour meets grit, where everyone’s wearing a disguise (whether they know it or not) and knowing the players takes a lot more than simply reading the score cards. Maybe everyone’s got something to hide, but they’ve got something to reveal, too. Scratch the surface and explore what secrets lie beneath — it’s bound to cost someone…a lot.

Here are the stories in Drag Noir, suitably wrapped in a stylish cover from S. L. Johnson:

Introduction by Dana Gravesen and Bryan Asbury , The Meaning of Skin – Richard Godwin , Wheel Man – Tess Makovesky , No. 21: Gabriella Merlo – Ben Solomon , Geezer Dyke – Becky Thacker , Lucky in Cards – Jack Bates , Trespassing – Michael S. Chong , Chianti – Selene MacLeod , The Changeling – Tracy Fahey , Straight Baby – Redfern Jon Barrett , Kiki Le Shade – Chloe Yates , Protect Her – Walter Conley , King Bitch – James Bennett , A Bit of a Pickle – Paul D. Brazill , Stainless Steel – Amelia Mangan , The Itch of the Iron, The Pull of the Moon – Carol Borden

Crime Fiction – Here and There and Again

Agnieszka Sienkiewicz-Charlish, Blackwitch Press, Crime Fiction, Crime Fiction – Here and There, Crime Fiction – Here and There and Again, Exiles, Gdansk, K A Laity, M.A., Now and Then, Prof. David Malcolm, Rachel Franks, Urszula Elias

crime gdansk2Back In 2012 I had the real pleasure of being at special guest at Crime Fiction – Here and There, Now and Then, an academic conference at the University Of Gdansk which was organised by Agnieszka Sienkiewicz-Charlish, M.A. and Urszula Elias, M.A. The Academic Advisor was Prof. David Malcolm, who has a story in Exiles: An Outsider Anthology.

Being an academic conference, a lot of it was way over my head but it was a very interesting and fun experience to be sure.

And they’ve done it again. I’ll be a guest along with K A Laity, Dr Rachel Franks and others:

Crime Fiction – Here and There and Again

11-13 September 2014

2nd International Postgraduate Conference

Department of English Language Cultures and Literatures, English Institute, Faculty of Languages of the University of Gdańsk
and the State School of Higher Professional Education in Elbląg

Accommodation

Advisory Board and Executive Committee

Call for Papers    [DOC] [PDF] – CLOSED

Conference Fee

Conference Venue

Honorary Patrons

Keynotes

Programme

Registration – CLOSED

Travel

2012 Conference

GdanskFind out more about the conferences and the people involved here.

And check out the Facebook page.

 

Recommended Reads: Hard-Boiled Witch by K. A . Laity

K A Laity, recommended reads

With her terrific  new short story series, Hard-Boiled Witch, K A Laity – authohard-boiled witchr of the cracking White Rabbit – once again mixes crime fiction, the supernatural and smart writing to come up with a lethal cocktail. Marvelous .

The Blurbs: Book 1: Hocus-Pocus You’re Dead. Hecate Sidlaw eats punks like you for breakfast — at least that’s what her familiar Henry claims. When someone needs a protection spell or a nasty hex, they knock on her door. Hecate can handle most magical problems, but what happens when a new crime kingpin gets a magic man of their own?

Book 2: Toil and Trouble. Hecate Sidlaw finds herself caught between a wannabe witch and one of the oldest hereditary powers in the land. When she and her familiar Henry end up as seconds in a magical duel, will anyone be left standing at the end of the shootout? Enter the dark streets and weird magic of HARD-BOILED WITCH and your life will never be quite the same. This is the second episode in the short story series.

Book 3:  Charms O’erthrown. Hecate Sidlaw finds herself in a wild storm of shady folks all looking for a priceless artifact that’s gone missing. With all the double dealing and surprising murders, it’s a wonder she and Henry can find out what’s really going on — and what this precious treasure could be. An ancient alchemical text may hold the answers if only Hecate and Henry can live long enough to get to the library!

Exiles Guest Blog:How I Wrote ‘Eating the Dream’ by K. A. Laity

Artizan, Blackwitch Press, Exiles, GUEST BLOGS, K A Laity

exiles artizanI’m trying to remember where this story came from. I know the title came first, but not really because before that came William Blake and the Red Dragon, but before that came Springsteen and songs of escape, but even before that came cars.

I grew up in a factory town where automobiles were the trade. Most of my extended family worked for the auto industry in one way or another. The reality of the auto industry hasn’t matched the promise of its sleek machines for some time; the ruins of it still smoulder in the hometown I left long ago. But romance of the open road has fueled the dream of freedom for as long as I can remember.

I still feel it when I hit the highway. I spent so long afraid I would never escape that the sight of a road stretched out before me buoys my spirit in an instant. I’ll probably never completely get over the whisper that cajoles, ‘You could go anywhere, disappear, start again.’

My old red Honda makes an appearance in this story. Sixteen years I had that car, hundreds of thousands of miles I put on it. Living in the UK,  I’m reminded again and again how people here have no concept of the size of the US: How the whole of this country could fit into just one of the medium-sized states. How you can still drive for hours without seeing another human being in some places, though it’s getting more difficult all the time. How states are as different as the countries of the EU, different worlds.

There’s an anonymity that all exiles know you can find in the darkened places where people drink and eat. Diners and pubs allow a certain camaraderie between strangers: brief, congenial, but definitely limited. But it’s good. Sometimes you have to be where nobody knows your name.

When you’re there in the dark corner, sipping your drink, look around. Under the brim of that hat may hide the eye of something extraordinary. Monster, magic, murder—maybe it depends on what you’re looking for. William Blake saw angels in his back garden as a child. Some people think that’s strange. Others long to find that magic. We read books for the same reason we take journeys: to see something new, to shake off the dust of the known and maybe, just maybe—to find the home that waits for us out there like a dream we can almost remember.

Bio: K. A. Laity is the award-winning author of White RabbitA Cut-Throat BusinessLush SituationOwl Stretching, Unquiet DreamsÀ la Mort SubiteThe Claddagh IconChastity FlamePelzmantel and Other Medieval Tales of Magic and Unikirja, as well as editor of Weird NoirNoir Carnival and the forthcoming Drag Noir. With cartoonist Elena Steier she created the occult detective comic Jane Quiet. Her bibliography is chock full of short stories, humor pieces, plays and essays, both scholarly and popular. She spent the 2011-2012 academic year in Galway, Ireland where she was a Fulbright Fellow in digital humanities at NUIG. Dr. Laity has written on popular culture and social media for Ms., The Spectator and BitchBuzz, and teaches medieval literature, film, gender studies, New Media and popular culture at the College of Saint Rose. She divides her time between upstate New York and Dundee.

Recommended Reads

All Due Respect, David Siddall, Jonathan Woods, K A Laity, Les Edgerton, recommended reads, top tips

Phone Call Final Cover high res (2)Galviston by Nic Pizzolatto

Haunting and hard-hitting, Nic Pizzolatto’s Galveston is a fantastic spin on the man-on-the run sub-genre of harboiled crime fiction. Prose as tight as a snare drum. Dashes of lyricism that never overpower the storytelling. Great, realistic characters and situations. Marvellous stuff.

Just Like That by Les Edgerton

Just Like That has it all. Great dialogue, whipcrack scenes and meaty characters haul you along on a hardboiled crime road-trip worthy of the Elmore Leonard and Joe R Lansdale. This then transforms into a terrific look at life behind bars. Most of all, this is a brilliant charter study full of a love of life and you can see why Edgerton has been described as a mixture of Charles Bukowski and Eddie Bunker. A shot to the heart as well as the head, Just Like That is highly recommended.

Phone Call From Hell and Other Tales Of The Damned by Jonathan Woods.

Jonathan Woods’ latest collection is a belter. The quirky and inventive collection starts off with quotes from Anthony Burgess and the Coen Brothers and leads with a story called ‘The Handgun’s Tale’ which is just that – the world from the perspective of a gun.

Other gems include the title story in which an eternal loser gets a phone call from Charles Manson, ‘The Old Man’ is classic and classy, ‘The Other Suitcase’, the story of Kafka’s missing smut and ‘Hearing Voices,’ which has a smart and funny twist on the femme fatale trope. ‘Crash & Burn,’ the final story, is a cinematic, high octane thriller. Rich writing full of strong images. Twisted and funny and brilliant.

White Rabbit by K A Laity

K A Laity’s White Rabbit is a marvelous and potent cocktail of crime fiction, screwball comedy and the supernatural. A cracking yarn choc full of brilliant lines that reminds you of Wodehouse, Preston Sturges and the Coen Brothers and yet is like nothing you’ve ever read before. Fantastic stuff. More please!

Hard-Boiled Witch: Hocus Pocus, You’re Dead by K A Laity

With her new short story series, Hard-Boiled Witch, K A Laity once again mixes crime fiction, the supernatural and smart writing to come up with a lethal cocktail. Marvellous.

The Killer Among Us by George Beck george beck

The Killer Among Us is classy stuff. A gripping and engrossing study of American small town life with echoes of Jim Thompson and John Steinbeck.

A Man Alone by David Siddall

David Siddall’s brilliantly hard-boiled debut novella A Man Alone is a gripping urban western worthy of a Walter Hill film

All Due Respect Magazine 2

The second issue of All Due Respect magazine is a 100% gem. Owen Laukkanen is the star of this issue with N.F.G, a brilliant take on the fisherman’s yarn, as well as an excellent interview with Chris F. Holm and an insight into the story. This is followed by a sharp slice of Gothic grunge from C S DeWildt. Other cracking stories, including the remarkable The Gulf by Scott Alderberg and Ice Cold Alibi a great piece of old school noir from the ever brilliant Eric Beetner. But every story is a gem and the reviews which finish off this issue are also well worth a read.

Guest Blog: Revisiting: SHADOW OF A DOUBT by K A Laity

film noir, films, GUEST BLOGS, K A Laity

soadThough it’s fallen out of fashion a wee bit, Hitchcock seemed to always consider this film his finest and people as wildly varying in their opinions as David Mamet and the baying jackals, er, critics of Rotten Tomatoes agree. Shadow of a Doubt offers a gripping tale with gruesome undertones. It’s a genuine snapshot of the American dream that brings out the nightmare inherent in its blindness, yet demonstrates its resilience without schmaltz.

 

Thornton Wilder penned the original script, though it was enhanced by the hands of Sally Benson (Meet Me in St. Louis) and Alma Reville (AKA Lady Hitchcock). I don’t really know how much input they had, yet I can’t help but feel Benson must have added a good bit. Wilder’s characters can be too mannered and the character of young Charlie is just so good. Consider the gals in St. Louis: Judy Garland’s Esther, the sweet girl next door, also belts the boy she thinks hurt her sister and Margaret O’Brien’s Tootie is really a monster child, causing chaos.

 

In any case we have a masterful film from Hitchcock that plays on some timeless themes: the charming cad who might be a murderer, the small town kid who longs for more excitement and the happy family about the be ripped apart. Hitchcock makes the most of the idea of shadows. While people don’t always think of this as noir, it certainly gets there quickly—peeling back the veneer of small town innocence to show the darkness behind it, just as Uncle Charlie snarls at his niece.

 

Joseph Cotten is superb as the Merry Widow Killer suspect. Hitchcock apparently wanted to use the beloved William Powell, but his studio refused to share him. Delightful as it is to contemplate him playing the role, Cotten owns this as much as he does The Third Man. When he slips and lets the monster out from behind the charmer’s mask, it’s utterly chilling.

 

Teresa Wright has a challenging transformation to make her dreamer of a girl courageous enough to stand up to a cold murderer. I always think I would have made Charlie more tomboyish but there’s something wonderful (and nigh-on Oedipal) in the doting niece leading her uncle around town with such pride. There’s the wonderful kitchen scene where she gushes about their being almost “twins”. He slips the fateful ring onto her finger in a parody of an engagement scene.

 

Everything works so well; Dimitri Tiomkin’s often ironic and nearly deranged use of the Merry Widow waltz loops around from light-hearted to menacing. We see Charlie struggle with the ideas of loyalty and family and the ending—apparently not the one Wilder scripted—avoids a neat resolution yet offers hope of the abiding kind: that we can always choose how we meet evil, because meet it we will. As Hitchcock told the press at the time, “Love and good order is no defense against evil”.

Bio: K. A. Laity is the award-winning author of White RabbitA Cut-Throat BusinessLush SituationOwl Stretchingkalaity, Unquiet DreamsÀ la Mort SubiteThe Claddagh IconChastity FlamePelzmantel and Other Medieval Tales of Magic and Unikirja, as well as editor of Weird NoirNoir Carnival and the forthcoming Drag Noir. With cartoonist Elena Steier she created the occult detective comic Jane Quiet. Her bibliography is chock full of short stories, humor pieces, plays and essays, both scholarly and popular. She spent the 2011-2012 academic year in Galway, Ireland where she was a Fulbright Fellow in digital humanities at NUIG. Dr. Laity has written on popular culture and social media for Ms., The Spectator and BitchBuzz, and teaches medieval literature, film, gender studies, New Media and popular culture at the College of Saint Rose. She divides her time between upstate New York and Dundee.

Short, Sharp Interview: K A Laity

K A Laity, Roman Dalton, short sharp interviews

it's a cursePDB: Can you pitch your latest book in 25 words or less?

KAL: I have two or three: do I get more words? No?! IT’S A CURSE: Roman Dalton gets mixed up with a couple of dames and things go badly. “Carlos” in SHAPESHIFTERS: FOX POCKET ANTHOLOGY 2 is another shifter of a very different sort with some classic Hollywood riffs. A CUT-THROAT BUSINESS: CHASTITY FLAME 3 is a break-neck paced international thriller.

PDB: Which music, books, films or television shows have floated your boat recently?

I’m watching American Horror Story: Coven, which is taxing my patience though Jessica Lange, Angela Bassett and Kathy Bates keep luring me back. Does no one in television pay attention to creating serial narratives? The showrunner or producers should be fired and someone who understands character development brought in at once. Meanwhile we’re also going through Arrested Development, which my sweetie had not seen before, which is a delight. I’m getting review copies of a lot of Hard Case Crime, the best of which so far have been Christa Faust’s two novels and Elissa Ward’s The Secret Lives of Married Women, which I haven’t written up yet. And I liked the Alan Moore/Malcolm McLaren/Fecundio Percio Fashion Beast a lot more than I thought I was likely to do.

PDB: Is it possible for a writer to be an objective reader?

Nah, you’re always thinking, “Oh no, that doesn’t work!” and how they should have done whatever you think isn’t working, because of course your way is the only way. Or if it’s really good you just gush with adoration because it’s so rare.

PDB: Do you have any interest in writing for films, theatre or television?

I love writing for theatre and it’s been a while, but in my massive to-do list is a play that’s not finished that I started for a conference and then got too busy to work on. If it doesn’t have a deadline and a publisher tapping her foot, the project goes to the end of the line, alas. I have a film script idea I’d like to work on but it has to wait until I finish something else.

k a laityPDB: How much research goes into each book?

Depends on the project: I’ve had to research the state of a body after being in the water for 12 hours as opposed to 24; the physical specifics of capybaras; working on a medieval thing that makes me look up a lot of details of material culture—although I’m a medievalist, most of my expertise is entirely in literature so I have to look up practical things like what underwear actually looked like.

PDB: How useful or important are social media for you as a writer?

Essential! If it weren’t for social media I would spend all my time weeping in despair. Now I can see that most of my creative friends are likewise suffering from the world’s indifference to their genius, so I don’t feel quite as bad. Writing is such solitary work; I can go online and instantly get the 21st century equivalent of Hal’s St. Crispian’s Day speech from friends half way around the world and feel energized that we few, we happy few, are creating stories and getting them out there before they are crushed by the Godzilla foot of indifference. With the globe spread out before me, I can actually find people who laugh at my jokes.

PDB: What’s on the cards for 2014?

January brings the Fox Spirit noir novella by Graham Wynd with the sexy cover by Sarah Langton, Extricate. It’s vintage noir in the north, two guys who are the best friends until one of them gets a woman the other wants. Sex, death and betrayal—not necessarily in that order and sometimes, all at once.

Later in the spring will be my next novel, the slightly supernatural noir White Rabbit, also from Fox Spirit. I know S. L. Johnson is working on a cover and I can’t wait to see what it looks like. James Draygo is a disgraced former officer who makes a living as a fake psychic—until the tacky trophy wife of a media mogul gets gunned down in front of him. There’s a conspiracy, a secret drug cult and a persistent journalist—and just maybe some real spooks. Dashiell Hammet meets Blue Sunshine! Still working on that blurb, obviously >_< What I love about Fox Spirit: Adele sees the value of these weird books that are hard to shoehorn into traditional genres.

So I should mention the call for stories for Drag Noir, which I’ll be editing for FS: got an idea for gender-bending tale, where glamour meets grit? Read the guidelines and submit!

Find out more about K. A. LAITY here.

Out now! It’s A Curse: A Roman Dalton Yarn by K A Laity

Blackwitch Press, K A Laity, Roman Dalton

it's a curse

It’s A Curse: A Roman Dalton Yarn is a noir/ horror short story based an characters created by Paul D. Brazill.

Roman Dalton’s woken up in the wrong place again, but this time he can’t blame it on the moon. Never mind the bikers, gamblers and gangsters, this time he’s got real trouble. Finding himself in a tug-of-war between two lovely women might sound like he’s landed in clover, but one wants to ‘save’ him and the other—well, he’s got a feeling she’s a whole lot of trouble wrapped up in that slinky designer gown. As far as our favourite werewolf PI’s concerned, IT’S A CURSE.

Noir Carnival – Out Now!

ANTHOLOGY, K A Laity, noir, Noir Carnival, Roman Dalton

Edited by K A Laity, Noir Carnival includes one of my Roman Dalton yarns, She’s My Witch.

The blurb: Whether you picture it as a travelling fair in the back roads of America of the hedonistic nights of the pre-Lenten festival where masks hide faces while the skin glories in its revelation. It’s about spectacle, artificiality and the things we hide behind the greasepaint or the tent flap.
Let these writers lead you on a journey into that heart of blackened darkness and show you what’s behind the glitz.
Underneath, we’re all freaks after all.

‘A heady cocktail of freaks, witches, monsters and flat out scary clowns – just like a carnival should be!’

~Greg Smith, Editor Fifty Shades of Geek

NOIR CARNIVAL

Table of Contents

Introduction: Caravan ~ K. A. Laity

Family Blessings ~ Jan Kozlowski

In the Mouth of the Beast ~ Li Huijia

Idle Hands ~ Hannah Kate

The Things We Leave Behind ~ Chris L. Irvin

She’s My Witch ~ Paul D. Brazill

The Mermaid Illusion ~ Carol Borden

Natural Flavouring ~ Rebecca Snow

Madam Mafoutee’s Bad Glass Eye ~ Chloë Yates

Buffalo Brendan and the Big Top Ballot ~ Alan Watson

Carne Levare ~ Emma Teichmann

Leave No Trace ~ A. J. Sikes

Fair ~ Robin Wyatt Dunn

Things Happen Here After Dark ~ Sheri White

Mister Know-It-All ~ Richard Godwin

Trapped ~ Joan De La Haye

The Price of Admission ~ Neal Litherland

Take Your Chances ~ Michael S. Chong

Young Mooncalf ~ Katie Young

The Teeth Behind the Beard ~ James Bennett

Published by Fox Spirit.