Recommended Read: It Never Leaves You by Luca Veste

it never leaves youWhile on surveillance, Liverpool policeman, Detective Inspector Murphy tells Detective Sergeant Rossi about one of his first cases. A case that still haunts him.

It Never Leaves You is a gripping, realistic and very touching short story that acts as a great introduction to Luca Veste‘s cracking series of crime fiction novels.

Quite remarkably, it still seems to be FREE! 

True Brit Grit now only 99p/ 99c!

Print Versions Of Drunk On The Moon & True Brit Grit OUT NOW !!!TRUE BRIT GRIT.

Edited by Paul D. Brazill and Luca Veste. Introduction by Maxim Jakubowski.

The Line Up:

1. Two Fingers of Noir by Alan Griffiths
2. Eat Shit by Tony Black
3. Baby Face And Irn Bru by Allan Guthrie
4. Pretty Hot T’Ing by Adrian Magson
5. Black Betty by Sheila Quigley
6. Payback: With Interest by Matt Hilton
7. Looking for Jamie by Iain Rowan
8. Stones in Me Pocket by Nigel Bird
9. The Catch and The Fall by Luke Block
10. A Long Time Coming by Paul Grzegorzek
11. Loose Ends by Gary Dobbs
12. Graduation Day by Malcolm Holt
13. Cry Baby by Victoria Watson
14. The Savage World of Men by Richard Godwin
15. Hard Boiled Poem (a mystery) by Alan Savage
16. A Dirty Job by Sue Harding
17. Stay Free by Nick Quantrill
18. The Best Days of My Life by Steven Porter
19. Hanging Stanley by Jason Michel
20. The Wrong Place to Die by Nick Triplow
21. Coffin Boy by Nick Mott
22. Meat Is Murder by Colin Graham
23. Adult Education by Graham Smith
24. A Public Service by Col Bury
25. Hero by Pete Sortwell
26. Snapshots by Paul D Brazill
27. Smoked by Luca Veste
28. Geraldine by Andy Rivers
29. A Minimum of Reason by Nick Boldock
30. Dope on a Rope by Darren Sant
31. A Speck of Dust by David Barber
32. Hard Times by Ian Ayris
33. Never Ending by McDroll
34. Imagining by Ben Cheetham
35. Escalator by Jim Hilton
36. Faces by Frank Duffy
37. A Day In The Death Of Stafford Plank by Stuart Ayris
38. The Plebitarian by Danny Hogan
39. King Edward by Gerard Brennan
40. This Is Glasgow by Steven Miscandlon
41. Brit Grit by Charlie Wade
42. Five Bags Of Billy by Charlie Williams
43. It Could Be You by Julie Morrigan
44. No Shortcuts by Howard Linskey
45. The Great Pretender by Ray Banks

45 British writers, 45 short stories. All coming together to produce an anthology, benefiting two charities…

Children 1st – http://www.children1st.org.uk/ and Francesca Bimpson Foundation – http://www.francescabimpsonfoundation.org

“The BRIT GRIT mob is coming to kick down your door with hobnailed boots. Kitchen-sink noir; petty-thief-louts; lives of quiet desperation; sharp, blood-stained slices of life; booze-sodden brawls from the bottom of the barrel and comedy that’s as black as it’s bitter—this is TRUE BRIT GRIT!”

Now only 99p/ 99c!

Recommended Read: The Dying Place by Luca Veste

The Dying PlaceWhen the body of a young man is found on the steps of a church, DI Murphy and DS Rossi – returning from Dead Gone,  Luca Veste‘s very enjoyable debut crime novel – are called in to investigate.

Veste’s second novel is very impressive indeed. Mature and tightly written, The Dying Place is a truly humanist piece of crime fiction. Veste smoothly  moves from the POVs of the victims, perpetrators and cops, creating a gripping, chilling and very moving piece of work.

Highly recommended.

Short, Sharp Interview: Tracey Edges

Tracey edgesPDB: What’s going on now?

This very minute I am ‘coming down’ from the Sunday morning madness that is Sunday Girl! Today was the Christmas Show so lots of indies, a couple of oldies, some non-Christmas tracks. Usual Sunday Girl eclectic mix but with a festive twist. The show airs 9-11am every Sunday morning but I am really at the go from about 7.30 to 12.30 plus, just chasing my tail trying to keep up with all the interaction on social media. It’s crazy but fun crazy.

PDB: How long have you been a Sunday Girl?

My very first show for Lincoln-based station, Siren FM 107.3 was on 11th August 2013. Today’s show (21st December 2014) was my 68th Sunday Girl. I really can’t believe that I have done that many!

PDB: What’s it like getting up early on a Sunday Morning?

Hell – I am a lazy sausage! I am terrible at getting to bed. Last night I was writing some of the next show until nearly 3am. I’ve always enjoyed lazy Sunday mornings but now I am running about the house like a mad thing trying to get ready and it’s straight on to social media which, once started, doesn’t let up for the next few hours.

PDB: How important are social media?

Immensely. I have accounts on all the main sites but I really only have time to fully service Facebook and then Twitter. As my listener base is global and in various time zones, getting show reminders out regularly is very important. Every week I take the time to put together a photo-playlist which has all the links, of the indie artists and authors, on as I love to be able, in my small way, to promote all that great talent that is out there but bubbling under the radar.

Also, without social media, I wouldn’t be able to communicate so easily with Artists from all over the world. I never take it for granted how easy it is to communicate with someone from New York, Japan, Costa Rica or even Poland! Actually – that can account for some of my late nights…

PDB: Which of your projects are you most proud of?

Oh gosh, that is a tough one. I am amazingly proud that I have my own radio show – I would never have thought that I would have had the nerve to do that, even though it was something that I wanted to do from being at school. In those days DJs were rather revered and I remember always dying to go to the Radio 1 roadshow when it came to Cleethorpes. With their big glitzy trailers it all seemed very glam!

I am also an artist and I am very proud that I have had very well received solo exhibitions and I am looking forward to getting back into painting, after a small hiatus.

I also have written some short stories and have been very flattered by the response to those. Writing more is also on the agenda and getting more published. It was a Tigger-moment to have ‘Memento’ accepted for the anthology “Off The Record 2 – At The Movies” and that book is very proudly sitting on my bookshelf. I have also written a continuous story blog called PI GY. It is a mix of fact and fiction and basically ‘me’ being a Private Investigator in Grimsby – a bit of a (very) low level NYPD or NCIS! I did record some for a radio series. That was my first experience with Siren FM – in fact my first experience of doing anything for radio, other than being interviewed on Estuary Radio about a smaller solo art exhibition I was showing at the time.

You can listen to that interview, and find out all about me as well as watching a slideshow of my work, here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5depLM8R6RU  The first radio series of PI GY can be heard at: http://www.sirenonline.co.uk/archives/3274

I also write a column for a magazine, The Peoples, called ‘Girl About Town’. That is available, free to read, on Issuu.

PDB: What’s your favourite film/ book/ song/ television programme?

Oh, blimey – I hate this question! I really don’t know – it’s usually the last one I enjoyed. I like to relax when reading, watching or listening so nothing too heavy or esoteric, although I like to be carried along by the ride – one that twists and turns and makes you wonder what is going to happen next.

I am a really frustrated bookworm and, as I’ve moved into a house that needs a lot  of work, I haven’t had the time to read much. I have just been engrossed in ‘After The Storm’ by Jane Lythell, which I have reviewed for a Sunday Girl Book of the Week feature (that was my 3am work last night!) and I will always have a soft spot for Tony Schumacher’s brilliant debut novel “The Darkest Hour”. I was lucky to be able to read that as he wrote it – bit by bit. That was frustrating and exciting in equal measure. It was also very interesting to see the journey it took from conception to being taken up by a major publisher, the editing process, and ending up on the bookshelves with the ensuing marketing and promotion. I also love Luca Vesta’s books, I have his second, in-waiting and so many more. I have a biography by Liz Kershaw, half read (brilliant as all about radio!) and “Pretty Broken Punks” by Martin Belk, madly waving at me to get them read.

I’m not really a film person, in an academic sense. I did watch Brief Encounter, for the first time last year, and it has inspired me to get going on a painting project based on that – the fleeting moment. That needs my house to get sorted out first though. At the moment I can’t get into my Art Studio for chairs (don’t ask!)

Music – all and everything. Sometimes I’m in the mood for something tinkly and classical, mostly I’m still a punk girl though and like a good blast. I love discovering new (to me) music and I find that the Indie radio presenters are such a great bunch that they are not at all precious and love to share the people they play so I have listened to a lot of people that I may never have come across otherwise. I have started to get into Electronic bands such as Naked Lunch, Rossetti’s Compass and Attrition – not a genre that I have ever really known much about but there is some really great new, and reinvented, music coming from that direction. I can’t say that I am a great fan of Country or Folk but I can even be turned in that direction by great music. Americana by Jane Allison is great and I even enjoy a bit of Yee-Haa-ing supplied by the likes of Mark Glazier and Morgin Breen. I am lucky to have some great local bands such as Kismet Ryding, Sunny and Boo-Boo, The Moth Lantern and many more.

Phew – TV! I have to admit to liking a good ol’ US of A television series. At the minute I’m watching Stalker and have just finished the first season of Nashville. As I said – it’s relaxing stuff to just flop out with. The Mentalist, Castle and sci-fi, such as Fringe are all favourites. I’m also watching the radio/podcast based sitcom, Maron.

PDB: What’s next?

Just carrying on, carrying on. Expanding all that I am doing and making it all even bigger and even better. Crossing fingers and working hard. I’ve tried to drop one thing or another but I have realised, that for me, I need to do less of all but more as the whole and bring it all together. I may start to include music and words in my Artwork, for example. You never stop exploring, learning and discovering and that is what I love doing. I can’t imagine doing anything else.

sunday girl

Bio: Tracey Edges is an Artist/Writer/Radio Presenter from Cleethorpes. She has lived in Oxfordshire, where she had great fun for 2 years at Art School and then loved studying Graphic Design, Illustration and Advertising at High Wycombe, Bucks.

After a few years, in a beautiful area of Cornwall, owning a village shop and post office, and pretending to be Mrs Goggins, she returned to Grimsby to concentrate on her Fine Art career. The past couple of years she has extended her creativity to include writing and radio presenting. Starting off with Estuary Radio, in Grimsby, she now has a weekly, Sunday Morning, 2 hour, well-received show with Lincoln’s Siren FM 107.3.

Links: Sunday Girl: www.sirenonline.co.uk/section/shows/sunday-girl
Facebook: Tracey Edges (profile) Tracey Edges Presenter (page)
Twitter: @tedges
Website: www.traceyedges.co.uk (woefully out of date – it’s on The To-Do List!)
Blogs: www.alittlebitoftraceyedges.blogspot.com (short stories)
www.traceyedges.blogspot.com (PI GY, continuous story blog)

Short, Sharp Interview: Luca Veste

luca bookPDB: Can you pitch DEAD GONE in 25 words or less?

A serial killer in Liverpool is replicating infamous psychology experiments on his victims. DI David Murphy and DS Laura Rossi must track him down.

PDB: Which music, books, films or television shows have floated your boat recently?

I rarely listen to newer music, so I’ve been so listening to a lot of Gary Moore recently. Eva Dolan’s debut novel  LONG WAY HOME, which is out in January,  is ace. As is Sarah Hilary‘s out in Feb. Helen FitzGerald’s The Cry is my favourite of 2013 though. Astounding book. I watched and hated the final series of Dexter. A terrible ending to a fantastic show. I’ve just started watching Breaking Bad, around five or six years after everyone else. Enjoying it so far.

PDB: Is it possible for a writer to be an objective reader?

In some ways, yes. In some ways, no. I think it’s difficult to separate the two from your mind, in that you’re sometimes thinking ‘I wouldn’t have written it that way’, or ‘you’ve just revealed the twist there with foreshadowing’. In contrast, when you read a great book, you know it and realise the work that has gone into making it so. The Shining Girls spoke to me in that vein this year. I could just see the amount of planning and plotting that went into that book that I may not have a few years previous.

PDB: Do you have any interest in writing for films, theatre or television?

Not really. It’s a much different arena to write within as dialogue is king now. Whereas in a novel you can spend time building a scene up it’s much more difficult I imagine to do the same in a shorter space of time. Although, some of the TV shows I’ve seen normally just use rain as a tool to do this.

PDB: How much research goes into each book?

For Dead Gone quite a bit. All the psychological experiment aspects had to be checked and researched, which was difficult as some of them haven’t really been written about all that much. The policing in the book is quite close to reality, with some poetic license (less paperwork). It’s fiction though, so some things will be changed to fit the story. I spent some time visiting places in Liverpool that I hadn’t been to in 20 years, just to make sure my blurred memory matched up. That was fun research though!

lucaPDB: How useful or important are social media for you as a writer?

I’d say it’s quite important. I’ve met a ton of awesome people via social media, so personally I’m grateful for that. I would have found it much more difficult to write the book in the first place without the support of so many. And anything that puts you in touch with readers is a good thing.

PDB: What’s on the cards for 2014?

Finish book two in January. It still has no title, which is a little weird, as I thought I’d have one by now. Then, I finish my degree in psychology and criminology in June. That’s been four years of work, so I’m looking forward to getting that done. A load of book festivals and drunken nights with other writers…sounds good to me!

Bio: Luca Veste is a writer of Italian and Scouse heritage. He also studies psychology and criminology at university in Liverpool. His first novel, Dead Gone, was released by HarperCollins imprint Avon in ebook form in December 2013, with the paperback coming out January 2014.

Dead Gone has been described as “chilling” by Mark Billingham, “Gripping” by Steve Mosby, and “quite dark, Luca…a little worrying” by his Grandma. Married, with two daughters, he hopes to sleep at some point before the year 2042.

Off The Record 2: Less Than A Pound/ Dollar.

otr2Edited by Luca Veste & Paul D. Brazill.

Off The Record 2: At The Movies  contains 47 short stories, based on classic film titles…

Following the Spinetingler award nominated ‘Off The Record‘, the charity anthology featuring stories based on classic song titles, comes the highly anticipated sequel.

This time, inspiration arrives in the form of classic film titles. With an introduction penned by Chris Ewan and featuring some of biggest and brightest names writing today including…

Will Carver, Steve Mosby, Helen FitzGerald, Adrian McKinty, Matt Hilton, Stav Sherez, Claire McGowan, Sean Cregan, David Jackson, Mel Sherratt, Nick Quantrill, Maxim Jakubowski, and many, many more…

47 writers from around the world. All coming together to raise money for two children’s literacy charities…

In the UK, National Literacy Trust.

In the US, Children’s Literacy Initiative.

From Crime to Fantasy, Taxi Driver to Weekend at Bernie’s, there’s something for everyone in this collection of 47 short stories.

And all proceeds from the sales of this anthology go directly to charity!

The eBook is book less than one dollar/ pound from AMAZON & AMAZON UK.

What The Hell Is Brit Grit ?

 

America may well be the  official home of pulp and noir but the United Kingdom, long  perceived as the land of True Brit Grit Guest Blog: It’s a Case of Having Good Genes! By Graham Smithtame Dame Agatha style cozies and stuck-up, Latin quoting police detectives, also has a grubby underbelly which has produced plenty of gritty crime writing. And there is a new wave of Brit Grit writers leaving their bloodstained footprints across this septic isle, too.
The godfathers of the new  Brit Grit could well be Ted Lewis, Derek Raymond and Mark Timlin with Jake Arnott, J J Connolly, Ian Rankin and Val McDermid as part of the next wave.
But in the last few years, more and more BRIT GRIT writers have been creeping out of the woodwork, through the cracks in the pavement, out of the dark and dingy alleyways.
Scottish crime writer Tony Black, for example, is the author of four novels featuring punch drunk, booze addled  Gus Dury, an ex  journalist turned reluctant Private Investigator whose shoulder has more chips than Harry Ramsden. The books  see Gus sniff around the back streets of Edinburgh and follow the rancid trail of crime and corruption right to to the top. They’re gruelling, intense and exciting journeys – not without moments of humour and tenderness. You may feel as if you’d like to give Gus a smack every few pages but the pit bull proves himself again and again.

Gus Dury may be in the gutter but he’s still looking at the stars, albeit through the bottom of a bottle of whisky. And it’s down to Black’s great writing that when you you finish one of his novels you feel battered and bruised  but can’t wait for the next round.

Pulp mastermind Otto Penzler  famously said that noir is about losers and not private investigators. Mr Penzler has probably never read any Tony Black – or fellow Scot Ray Banks, then. Banks’ Cal Inness quartet is the real deal. Inness is true loser. He’s a screw up. A lush. A mess. A man so far in denial he’s in the Suez. In each  brilliant tale he bangs his head against as many brick walls as he can. And he feels the pain. And so do we. The quartet is as bitter and dark as an Irish coffee and leads to a shocking yet inevitable conclusion.

And there’s more: There’s Alan Guthrie who gave us the best novel of 2009 with SLAMMER; Nick Quantrill ‘Broken Dreams’ which looks at a Northern English town that has had it’s fair shair of kickings but still isn’t out for the count; Bad Penny Blues is Cathi Unsworth’s  ambitious look at  the many facets of London in the late fifties and early sixies; Comic genius Charlie William’s and his nightclub bouncer hero Royston Blake help you see life in a way that Paulo Coelho never will!
There are BRIT GRIT publishers too:  Newcastle’s Byker Books publish Industrial Strength Fiction such as the Radgepacket – Tales from the Inner Cities anthologies; Brighton based Pulp Press publish short, punchy novellas with the slogan ‘Turn Off Your T.V. and discover fiction like it used to be.’

And there’s even more …
There’s Howard Linskey, Martin Stanley, Jack Strange, Paul Heatley, Mrtina Cole,  Ben Cheetham, Christopher Black, Martyn Waites,Allen Miles, Danny Hogan, Chris Leek, Gary Dobbs,  Gareth Spark, Sheila Quigley, Ian Ayris, UV Ray, Danny King,  Col Bury, Mark Billingham,  Andrew Bell, Alan Griffiths (whose blog is aptly called BRIT GRIT), Julie Lewthwaite, Steve Mosby, Darren Sant, McDroll, Richard Godwin, Colin Graham, Neil White, Andy Rivers . . . and more! There’s even comic BRIT GRIT from Donna Moore and Christopher Brookmyre, BRIT GRIT thrillers from Matt Hilton and surrealist BRIT GRIT from Jason Michel!

And now, of course, we have True Brit Grit- A Charity Anthology edited by Luca Veste and me, with an introduction from Brit Grit mastermind Maxim Jakubowski. True Brit Grit is a hard-hitting, gritty, crime anthology  from 45 British writers. All coming together to produce an anthology, benefiting two charities.

Oh, and I even have a weekly column- Brit Grit Alley over at Out Of The Gutter Online!

“The BRIT GRIT mob is coming to kick down your door with hobnailed boots.
Kitchen-sink noir; petty-thief-louts; lives of quiet desperation; sharp,
blood-stained slices of life; booze-sodden brawls from the bottom of the barrel
and comedy that’s as black as it’s bitter–this is BRIT GRIT!”

(This is adapted from a piece that first appeared in the program for the 2010 Noircon and was later republished at Pulp Metal Magazine)

 

Off The Record 2- At The Movies is Out Now !!!

Off The Record 2- At The Movies is an anthology of 47 short stories, based on film titles, from some of the  best and most bad-bum writers around.

And all proceeds go to charity.

Find out more in my latest Brit Grit Alley column which is, as usual, over at Out Of The Gutter Online.

BRIT GRIT ALLEY

Brit Grit Alley features weekly news and updates on what’s happening down British crime fiction’s booze and blood soaked alleyways. Every Wednesday.

Pop over to Out Of The Gutter Online and have a gander at my little column.

Here.

OFF THE RECORD 2 – AT THE MOVIES : COMING SOON!

Looking tasty, eh? Great cover by Steven Miscandlon. More info and cast list at Luca Veste’s Guilty Conscience.

True Brit Grit

True Brit Grit is out now!

“The BRIT GRIT mob is coming to kick down your door with hobnailed boots. Kitchen-sink noir; petty-thief-louts; lives of quiet desperation; sharp, blood-stained slices of life; booze-sodden brawls from the bottom of the barrel and comedy that’s as black as it’s bitter—this is BRIT GRIT!”

45 British writers, 45 short stories. All coming together to produce an anthology, benefiting two charities…

Children 1st – http://www.children1st.org.uk/

and

Francesca Bimpson Foundation – http://www.francescabimpsonfoundation.org

The line up…

Introduction by Maxim Jakubowski

1. Two Fingers of Noir by Alan Griffiths 2. Eat Shit by Tony Black 3. Baby Face And Irn Bru by Allan Guthrie 4. Pretty Hot T’Ing by Adrian Magson 5. Black Betty by Sheila Quigley 6. Payback: With Interest by Matt Hilton 7. Looking for Jamie by Iain Rowan 8. Stones in Me Pocket by Nigel Bird 9. The Catch and The Fall by Luke Block 10. A Long Time Coming by Paul Grzegorzek 11. Loose Ends by Gary Dobbs 12. Graduation Day by Malcolm Holt 13. Cry Baby by Victoria Watson 14. The Savage World of Men by Richard Godwin 15. Hard Boiled Poem (a mystery) by Alan Savage 16. A Dirty Job by Sue Harding 17. Stay Free by Nick Quantrill 18. The Best Days of My Life by Steven Porter 19. Hanging Stanley by Jason Michel 20. The Wrong Place to Die by Nick Triplow 21. Coffin Boy by Nick Mott 22. Meat Is Murder by Colin Graham 23. Adult Education by Graham Smith 24. A Public Service by Col Bury 25. Hero by Pete Sortwell 26. Snapshots by Paul D Brazill 27. Smoked by Luca Veste 28. Geraldine by Andy Rivers 29. A Minimum of Reason by Nick Boldock 30. Dope on a Rope by Darren Sant 31. A Speck of Dust by David Barber 32. Hard Times by Ian Ayris 33. Never Ending by McDroll 34. Imagining by Ben Cheetham 35. Escalator by Jim Hilton 36. Faces by Frank Duffy 37. A Day In The Death Of Stafford Plank by Stuart Ayris 38. The Plebitarian by Danny Hogan 39. King Edward by Gerard Brennan 40. This Is Glasgow by Steven Miscandlon 41. Brit Grit by Charlie Wade 42. Five Bags Of Billy by Charlie Williams 43. It Could Be You by Julie Morrigan 44. No Shortcuts by Howard Linskey 45. The Great Pretender by Ray Banks

You can get it as an ebook from Amazon.

Or  a paperback  from Lulu.

True Brit Grit At The Cinema And On TV

True Brit Grit

A bit back, I wrote an article for The Sabotage Times about Brit Grit television. I took a gander at three shows in particular, Public Eye, Gangsters and Cracker. All were in-your-face, hard-hitting crime dramas from the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s respectively.

And now, it looks like a bunch of the writers that have contributed to the True Brit Grit charity anthology that I co-edited (with Luca Veste) are going to be putting the grit back on the box.

Tony Black, for example, is due to have his intense crime novel Long Time Dead made into a film, directed by Richard ‘Jobbo The Yobbo’ Jobson. And Black’s debut, Paying For It, is due to have the television treatment.

And there’s more.

Howard Linskey’s critically acclaimed The Drop is being adapted for the small screen by JJ ‘Layer Cake’ Connolly, no less!

Sheila Quigley’s Seahills Estate debut, Run For Home, has been scheduled to be made into a telly series, too.

Adrian Magson’s first Harry Tate novel, Red Station, is due to blast out on to big screen as the start of a franchise to equal that of Jason Bourne!

So, who’s next?

Certainly, Matt Hilton’s Joe Hunter thrillers would make great high-octane action cinema and wouldn’t someone like to be able to get a handle on Charlie Williams’ blackly-comic Mangel books or Ray Banks’ poignant Cal Innes Quartet?

So, if you want to get a taste of these stars in the making, you could do worse than pick up True Brit Grit- A Charity Anthology. Here’s the blurb:

“The BRIT GRIT mob is coming to kick down your door with hobnailed boots. Kitchen-sink noir; petty-thief-louts; lives of quiet desperation; sharp, blood-stained slices of life; booze-sodden brawls from the bottom of the barrel and comedy that’s as black as it’s bitter—this is BRIT GRIT!”

45 British writers, 45 short stories. All coming together to produce an anthology, benefiting two charities…
Children 1st – http://www.children1st.org.uk/
and
Francesca Bimpson Foundation – http://www.francescabimpsonfoundation.org

The line up…

Introduction by Maxim Jakubowski

1. Two Fingers of Noir by Alan Griffiths 2. Eat Shit by Tony Black 3. Baby Face And Irn Bru by Allan Guthrie 4. Pretty Hot T’Ing by Adrian Magson 5. Black Betty by Sheila Quigley 6. Payback: With Interest by Matt Hilton 7. Looking for Jamie by Iain Rowan 8. Stones in Me Pocket by Nigel Bird 9. The Catch and The Fall by Luke Block 10. A Long Time Coming by Paul Grzegorzek 11. Loose Ends by Gary Dobbs 12. Graduation Day by Malcolm Holt 13. Cry Baby by Victoria Watson 14. The Savage World of Men by Richard Godwin 15. Hard Boiled Poem (a mystery) by Alan Savage 16. A Dirty Job by Sue Harding 17. Stay Free by Nick Quantrill 18. The Best Days of My Life by Steven Porter 19. Hanging Stanley by Jason Michel 20. The Wrong Place to Die by Nick Triplow 21. Coffin Boy by Nick Mott 22. Meat Is Murder by Colin Graham 23. Adult Education by Graham Smith 24. A Public Service by Col Bury 25. Hero by Pete Sortwell 26. Snapshots by Paul D Brazill 27. Smoked by Luca Veste 28. Geraldine by Andy Rivers 29. A Minimum of Reason by Nick Boldock 30. Dope on a Rope by Darren Sant 31. A Speck of Dust by David Barber 32. Hard Times by Ian Ayris 33. Never Ending by McDroll 34. Imagining by Ben Cheetham 35. Escalator by Jim Hilton 36. Faces by Frank Duffy 37. A Day In The Death Of Stafford Plank by Stuart Ayris 38. The Plebitarian by Danny Hogan 39. King Edward by Gerard Brennan 40. This Is Glasgow by Steven Miscandlon 41. Brit Grit by Charlie Wade 42. Five Bags Of Billy by Charlie Williams 43. It Could Be You by Julie Morrigan 44. No Shortcuts by Howard Linskey 45. The Great Pretender by Ray Banks

Get stuck in there!