News: An Interview and A Few Reviews

All Due Respect, Bristol Noir, Col's Criminal Library, Interviews, Man Of The World, Paul D Brazill, Reviews, Susan Hampson

MOTW x2

Colman Keane interviewed me over at Col’s Criminal Library.

Did the end result mirror your expectations at the start of the process, or is it a very different book to what you imagined?

Yes, it has the balance of violent, vivid pulp fiction and sixties Britcom that I wanted. I also wanted more gaudy characters and packed in as many as possible. But, as always, I just started writing until it seemed like the right time to stop.

 

He also reviewed Man Of The World.

‘Seatown, London, aging, health issues, family, old friends, old enemies, long memories, gangsters, cops, guns, death, booze, pubs, cafes, kebabs, jukeboxes, ciggies, cocaine, a secret Ministry, Thatcher, Bowie, Ripley and Highsmith, AC/DC, Carol Vorderman, Camden Market, Donna Summer, Elton John, Warsaw, and an intended retirement that just won’t stick. A busy book and one I thoroughly enjoyed.’

SusanHampson reviewed Man Of The World at Books From Dust Till Dawn.

‘The violence is lightened with the dry rugged humour that is embedded on every page along with music classics from yesteryear where it makes for an unforgettable melody of cracking entertainment. I always read these books twice to make sure that I don’t miss any the first time around because Paul Brazil has a subtle sense of humour that I sometimes miss. After all, I am still wrapped up in something that tickled me a couple of sentences back.’

And Bristol-Noir also took a gander at Man Of The World.

There are rich characters, pithy dialogue, giggles, fights and seediness galore throughout…

But, if you want it, there’s more here…a whole lot of layers to be peeled back and devoured.’

Thanks to all!

Crime Fiction Lover reviews Man Of The World

Crime Fiction Lover, Man Of The World, Paul D Brazill, Reviews

Brit grit author Paul D Brazill follows his 2018 novella Last Year’s Man with a return to Seatown, where we pick up the continuing story of hitman Tommy Bennett. Perched somewhere on the Northeast coast, Seatown is cold, wet and windy, the kind of place that makes your joints ache as you acquaint yourself with an ageing gangland killer who seems to have spent half his career on the verge of retirement. But what sort of pension do you get after years of shooting, stabbing, stamping and generally evading anything resembling a normal life?’

READ THE REST OF THIS TERRIFIC REVIEW HERE.

cfl

 

 

Gumshoe Blues Review Round Up

BRIT GRIT, Close To the Bone, Gumshoe Blues, Paul D Brazill, Peter Ord, Reviews, seaside noir, Seatown

 

gumshoe bluesIn the wake of the book blog tour organised by BLACKTHORN BOOK TOURS, Gumshoe Blues: The Peter Ord Yarns has garnered a hell of a lot of positive reviews – mostly 4 and 5 stars. A few more reviews have also have also popped up over at Goodreads and at Amazon.

So, I thought I’d try to do a review round up and hope I haven’t missed any.

And thanks very much to all involved. You are appreciated!

Rough Justice, Crime Fiction Lover –

‘Humour is ever present, often dark, unsophisticated and absurd. The result is a very kind of British noir, as if Jim Thompson had written his stories of doomed losers on the back of bawdy seaside postcards.’

Stephanie Jane, Literary Flits –

‘I love Brazill’s dry humour and scathing turns of phrase which contrast well with his eye for an absurd situation. All of his characters have a ring of authenticity to them with even people who only put in the briefest of appearances being utterly believable.’

Ross Jeffery –

‘The result is dark, witty, farcical and thoroughly entertaining.’

Kevin McNamara –

‘Filled with colorful characters and Mr. Brazill’s wonderful wit.’

Terry (TBC) –

‘northern grit & grim & honestly funny’

Christi M –

‘Overall, fans of gritty noir stories will enjoy this book. Characters are quirky and memorable and it doesn’t hurt that it comes with a good dose of dark humor. Also want to give props to the author for all the extremely well-thought out characters. It must have been incredibly fun to create all their backstories.’

Robert B –

‘This book engrossed me so much that I finished it in two sessions. I highly recommend it’

Isobel Blackthorn –

‘Told masterfully with tremendous wit and realism in taut, punchy prose, Gumshoe Blues contributes a work of considerable merit to the noir crime stable.’

Susan Hampson –

‘Paul Brazill is a master of one-liner dry-humour beauties that constantly roll from each page. His descriptions of people are unique, the like of which you have never heard before but it brings each character to life in its own memorable way. Yes, Paul Brazill, you are a genius in my eyes and I want everyone to read your books.’

Paul Matts –

‘Paul D Brazill has produced another collection of gritty, gutter-laden and immensely colourful characters, led by the main man himself. Plots develop and musical references abound. Really enjoyable stuff.’

Julie Porter –

‘Brazill transports the genre to England where he not only pays tribute to the hard boiled detectives but updates the genre to give it a postmodern Millennial sensibility making the hard edges even harder, the cynical detective even more self-aware, and filling it with pop culture references and technology to amuse modern Readers.’

David Burnham –

‘The pages oozed with rich, multi-layered plot progression and detail.’

Amit Verma –

‘Not a long boring, uselessly burdened thriller book, but short Quirky and interesting stuff you are going to like.’

Amy Shannon –

‘Brazill writes very well and knows how to keep the balance between dark and light, as well as humoristic satire and farce.’

Lel Budge –

‘Utter madness, with intense imagery, music references and so darkly funny. Thoroughly entertaining.’

Haley Belinda –

‘Paul Brazill is a very entertaining writer whose work flows and produces quite a lot of laughs as well. I love the dry sense of humour that flows through the book.’

Ruth Ann Garcia –

‘Great and fast read.’

Simon Maltman –

‘Hard boiled and humorous in equal measures.’

Danny Farham –

‘The author never lets the book get too dark, as it is peppered with razor sharp wit and one-liners that had me giggling like a schoolgirl.’

Kimberly-

‘I give props to the author for his fantastic descriptions of the setting, as well as those secondary characters.’

Graham Wynd-

‘crime with the feel of a shaggy dog story, complete with running jokes.’

Dee Arr-

‘Author Paul D. Brazill’s crime noir novel is a collage of characters that roll in and out of the pages. He paints with a brush loaded with dark humor, and his descriptions are what power the book.’

Nick Gerrard-

‘Crisp, raw-to-the-bone prose.

Andy Rausch –

‘Brazill is a writer’s writer’

Hector Duarte Jr

‘Punchy fun’

Ray Douglas –

‘A gritty tale full of twists and turns, dark places and dark humour.’

JW-

‘Gumshoe Blues is a clever, humorous piece of work and in Peter Ord you have an endearing if perpetually hapless central figure who you can’t help finding yourself rooting for.’

Warren Stalley –

‘The most impressive thing about these stories are the classic one liners and dazzling word play that author Mr Brazill expertly weaves throughout the narrative.’

You can grab GUMSHOE BLUS here, if you fancy it!

 

 

Gumshoe Blues Book Tour

Blackthorn Book Tours, Gumshoe Blues, Paul D Brazill, Reviews

BLACKTHORN BOOK TOURS have organised a book tour for Gumshoe Blues, and what a bloody good job they’ve done.

The tour has already kicked off with a great review from Elizabeth Blackthorn herself.  Orlando Books and Lit Flits have also said some very nice things about Gumshoe Blues.

I’ll add more links as they appear and do a round up at the end of the tour.

Thanks Blackthorn Book Tours!

gumshoe blues book tour.png

 

Dee Arr reviews Gumshoe Blues

BRIT GRIT, Close To the Bone, Dee Arr, Gumshoe Blues, Paul D Brazill, Reviews, seaside noir, Seatown, Short Story

Over at Amazon.com, broadcaster Dee Arr gives Gumshoe Blues a HELL of a good FIVE STAR review:

‘Dark, Humorous, Liquor-Drenched: Just a Stroll Through Seatown

Welcome to a place where ethics and loyalty might rely on who bought the last round. Peter Ord is our detective/tour guide, and we are treated to an intimate peek into the swamp that is his life. Bad things happen, and Peter is one of those folks who will be around to clean up.

As long as he gets paid, of course.

Author Paul D. Brazill’s crime noir novel is a collage of characters that roll in and out of the pages. He paints with a brush loaded with dark humor, and his descriptions are what power the book. Two sentences from the first page say so much: “I was lying on a brown tweed sofa and tangled up in a tartan blanket that had seen better days and nights. I was home.”

Gumshoe Blues is a series of vignettes rather than one long case. Peter’s cases are far from ordinary, possibly due to the quirkiness of the people he knows and deals with on a daily basis. Strange cases lead to strange solutions, and the author’s wry comments keep the book funny and constantly moving forward. A character introduced in one spot might have a leading role the next week. Life is constantly moving in Peter’s world, especially when flavored with a heavy dose of noir. Quick fun read, and never a dull moment. Five stars.

gumshoe blues

 

A Few More Top Reviews For Gumshoe Blues

Andy Rausch, BRIT GRIT, Close To the Bone, Crime Fiction Lover, Graham Wynd, Gumshoe Blues, Kevin Burton Smith, Paul D Brazill, Reviews, seaside noir, Seatown, The Haunted Pen, The Thrilling Detective Website

Well, GUMSHOE BLUES: THE PETER ORD YARNS continues to garner some well tasty reviews.

At THE HAUNTED PEN, David Burnham says:

‘Brazill’s descriptive work shines as he paints a written image of the colorful, memorable characters and places Ord encounters – pubs, bars, strip joints, cemeteries, and caravan sites to list just a few. I believe that in noir the location is just as much a character as the people who live there, and the author knocks it out of the park with his descriptions and dialog.’

You can read the rest of the review here.

At THE NEW THRILLING DETECTIVE WEBSITE, Kevin Burton Smith says:

Liberally laced with black humour, with a spritz of Don Quixote laid on top for good measure, Gumshoe Blues (2019) is some kinda read. Some kinda rough, cheeky, up-yours kinda read, I should add.

Read the rest of the review here.

At CRIME FICTION LOVER, Michael Parker says:

‘The result is a very kind of British noir, as if Jim Thompson had written his stories of doomed losers on the back of bawdy seaside postcards.’

You can read the rest of the review here.

GRAHAM WYND says:

‘The northern setting of Gumshoe Blues offers a laconic pace which suits the humour and makes the stark failures of the impromptu gumshoe Peter Ord a little (dare I say it?) poignant.’

You can read the rest of the review here.

ANDY RAUSCH says:

Brazill is a master at work here, and I for one cannot wait to see what he does next. FIVE STARS. If I could give it more, I would. It’s that good.’

You can read the rest of the review here.

And, if it takes your fancy, you can pick up GUMSHOE BLUES here.

gumshoe blues

A Few More Top Reviews for Gumshoe Blues

Alan Savage, BRIT GRIT, Gumshoe Blues, Hector Duarte Jr, Kevin McNamara, Paul D Brazill, Peter Ord, Reviews, seaside noir, Seatown, Warren Stalley

GUMSHOE BLUES: THE PETER ORD YARNS continues to get the thumbs up from readers.

Over at Goodreads, Kevin McNamara says:

Another fast read from Paul Brazill, this book is about Seatown PI Peter Ord. Filled with colorful characters and Mr. Brazill’s wonderful wit, these are stories from a seedy town and a new PI who will do just about anything to make a buck. Well written and shows a side of life most of us never see. Looking forward to the next Paul Brazill treasure.

At Amazon.com, Hector Duarte Jr says:

Paul Brazill always brings the goods with characters you won’t forget thrown into situations they’d love to hit the rewind button on. Peter Ord navigates us through the boozy, blue collar streets of Seatown, spinning yarns best read with a tall pint and pork pie at hand. Two pints up for Gumshoe Blues.’

And at Amazon.co.uk,  Warren Stalley says:

Gumshoe Blues: The Peter Ord Yarns by Paul D Brazill comprises of the following four short stories – Gumshoe Blues, Mr Kiss And Tell, Who Killed Skippy? and The Lady And The Gimp. The book follows the shambling adventures of cut price private eye Peter Ord who lurches in and around Seatown, a rain soaked coastal town in the bleak North East of England. The most impressive thing about these stories are the classic one liners and dazzling word play that author Mr Brazill expertly weaves throughout the narrative. Despite the grim and grey environment there’s a black gallows humour that makes this book a real pleasure to read. If you haven’t read anything before by Paul D Brazill then I suggest Gumshoe Blues is an excellent place to start. Enjoy.

and Alan Savage says:

Paul D. Brazill is a writer in an over-crowded genre of misfit detectives and their misadventures, but Paul has cornered a niche all of his own. I’d call it knock-about northern Brit Grit, the details can be as ultra-violent as a Tarantino vintage classic, but there is always a salty port-town humour about his writings. He gets better and better and I think he should get his books off to some tv production company because his stories would make great fast-paced dirty drama – destined for cult status surely?

All of which is very nice indeed!

gumshoe blues

 

 

 

A Couple of Top Reviews for Gumshoe Blues

Beth Fine, BRIT GRIT, Close To the Bone, Gumshoe Blues, Mark Slade, Paul D Brazill, Peter Ord, Reviews

Over at Amazon.com, Mark Slade and Beth Fine have given GUMSHOE BLUES 5 STAR REVIEWS, which is very nice indeed.

Mark Slade says:

One of my favorite crime writers is back and doesnt disappoint! My man, Paul Brazill spins some great crime tales!

and Beth Fine says:

Paul Brazill succeeds with Gumshoe Blues by keeping his story focused on his main protagonist, Peter Ord, after developing his character through a series of witty encounters and flashbacks. His supporting characters move the plot forward, and frequently provide comic relief to lighten the mood, preventing the book from feeling too dark or tragic. This book engrossed me so much that I finished it in two sessions. I highly recommend it.

Check ’em out here, if you’re that way inclined.

Gumshoe Blues

Updates! A new interview, a few reviews and a Portrait …

BRIT GRIT, Danny Farnham, Dr J, Gumshoe Blues, Interviews, Mermaid In These Jeans, NFReads, Paul D Brazill, Portrait Of The Artist As A Consumer, Punk Noir Mgazine, Reviews, seaside noir, Seatown, Tony Eames

Bits and bobs have been going recently, so I’ll give you a brief update, if you’re that way inclined …

I have an interview with Tony Eames up at NFReads

‘What is/are the real-life story(ies) behind your book(s)?

I draw a lot from real-life: actual incidents, people, names. My most recent publication, Gumshoe Blues, is about a private eye called Peter Ord. He’s named after one of my friends from my hometown of Hartlepool, and a lot of the scrapes he’s involved in are based on things that have happened to me or my friends – or friends of friends. Usually the most absurd things, as I’ve no interest in reading about the mundane and can’t imagine that anyone else does either.’

You can read the rest here.

GUMSHOE BLUES has been picking up some more than decent reviews …

Blogger MERMAID IN THESE JEANS said:

‘Gumshoe Blues is a clever, humorous piece of work and in Peter Ord you have an endearing if perpetually hapless central figure who you can’t help finding yourself rooting for.’

Over at Amazon.co.uk, DANNY FARNHAM said:

The author never lets the book get too dark, as it is peppered with razor sharp wit and one-liners that had me giggling like a schoolgirl. I’ll definitely read more by this author..’

And Dr J said:

‘I recently had the chance to read Gumshoe Blues by Paul Brazill. It was a lyrical and engaging example of detective fiction.’

PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A  CONSUMER was a regular feature in the New Musical Express back in the ’70s and‘80s where musicians listed favourite books, films etc. I always enjoyed it, so I thought I’d rip off the idea and revive it for PUNK NOIR MAGAZINE.

I recently did one myself.

You can read it here.

gumshoe blues

Gumshoe Blues is reviewed at STORGY MAGAZINE

Barbara F Jones, BRIT GRIT, Close To the Bone, Gumshoe Blues, Paul D Brazill, Peter Ord, Reviews, Seatown, Storgy Magazine

Over at STORGY MAGAZINE, Barbara F. Jones takes an early look at GUMSHOE BLUES – which will be published by CLOSE TO THE BONE  at the end of the month.

She says it’s

A thoroughly enjoyable read. Brazill’s vivid imagery doubled with his noir-yet-comical style make it impossible to put down.

Read the rest of this cracking review here.

Gumshoe Blues

 

 

 

Some Top Reviews

Aidan Thorn, Elgin Bleeker, Kill Me Quick!, Last Year's Man, Paul D Brazill, Reviews, Supernatural Noir

 

20180810_175041-e1552119751445.jpg

My books have had some very tasty reviews lately, which is nice.

Over at The Dark Time, ace crime writer Elgin Bleeker reviews Last Year’s Man and says:

‘Picking up a novel by Paul D. Brazill, a reader can expect fast paced action, humorous observations, funny dialogue, and a seedy, noir quality. His book, Last Year’s Man, delivers all that and something else: a touch of melancholy, a bit of sadness.

Tommy Bennett, an aging gun for hire, reluctantly comes to the conclusion that he is too old for his chosen profession. That profession is killing people and doing it efficiently with no trace of his involvement.

The story opens with Tommy on a job. A moment’s negligence on his part screws up a nice clean hit. It leaves him wondering if it is time to get out of the business. His next job goes wrong, too, but in a much bigger way, and Tommy is no longer wondering. He has to quit and run.

With little money and no passport, there are few places Tommy can go. He chooses to return to his hometown, a small city by the sea that has seen better days. Brazill highlights the city’s decay as Tommy takes in the town for the first time in many years. He gets off the train and notes the shops that are gone and the once proud statute in of “an old civic dignitary,” with a road cone on its head, and “the remnants of a Chinese take-away in its outstretched hand.”

He isn’t in town five minutes when he stumbles into a killing in a crummy bar. Soon, he is back in the company of violent crooks and con men he knew in his youth. But Tommy has to make a living and the local criminals remember him as a guy who can make things happen.

The slangy speech of Brazill’s characters not only gave me a laugh, but also provided an instant picture of the speaker. In a few words, Brazill describes characters. Of an underworld dame, Tommy says, “Bev smiled but there was the familiar razor-sharp look in her eyes.” Placing razor and eyes in the same sentence made me cringe and I knew just what Bev looked like. Later, Tommy calls a local heavy, “an ex-copper who was so bent you could use him to unblock your toilet.”

Last Year’s Man is a raw story seen through the eyes of Tommy Bennett, and is another fine job from Paul D. Brazill. I rarely say this about a book, but I wish this one was longer so I could spend more time with Tommy. ‘

At Amazon.com, Dr Nicola Parry gave Kill Me Quick FIVE STARS and said:

Wow, I loved this noirvella!

You definitely don’t have to be British to love this book, but I think being British will make you love it even more—especially if you were born and raised in a decent-sized city. And the cover art is classic “British seaside” — great choice!

As I began reading it, I had so many flashbacks to my youth and the locals and cultures of my northern hometown: the seedy pubs; the music; the weekend club scene; musicians who never seemed to take off, figuratively or literally; and the neighbourhood criminals whom everyone knew about, but avoided. Of course, the parallels will exist in every city in every country, but I definitely think this story will light an extra-special spark for fellow Brits!

And, for most of us, this book takes that hometown memory a few steps further—right into the heart of the local criminal underworld. Really dark humour, amazing character names that will make you laugh out loud, and a hilarious linking of plots as the story draws to its conclusion.

Crime writer Aidan Thorn also reviewed Kill Me Quick and said:

When it comes to the novella Paul Brazill is one of the best and Kill Me Quick doesn’t disappoint. Following Mark around Seatown, he’s not sure what’s going on the story unfolds for the reader as it does for Mark. There’s a great cast of people that Mark does and doesn’t want to see from his past. The book uses music to set an atmosphere of a time when things were much better for Mark, he used to be someone, sort of. Now he’s just a face in a town he used to know and there’s crime following him about as he just wants to have a beer and a chat.  All the usual Brazill wit and twists are here. Well worth your time.

And D. S. Atkinson said of Supernatural Noir:

This mix concept comes off really well. I wasn’t sure how the stories would function, but they were fun and interesting. Just enough blood to keep things lively too. Good stuff.

Last Year’s Man makes 10th Rule Books’ best 5 books from 2018

10th Rule Books, Indie, Last Year's Man, Paul D Brazill, Reviews

cover-brazill-last-years-man-5

They say:

‘In no particular order our favorite books from 2018:

Know Me From Smoke – Matt Phillips – Fahrenheit 13

This one is old school noir done right. The dialog cuts and so do the knives. Convicted killer Royal Atkins finds himself back on the streets and in a relationship with Stella Radney, a singer* whose husband was a victim of Royal’s. What could go wrong? Well, a lot, a whole hell of a lot.

Find some trouble here

Scapegoat – Adam Howe and James Newman – Honey Badger Press

A non-stop bit of wrong place and wrong time backwoods horror filled with dark humor, religious fanatics, violence, gore, bizarre rituals, and 80’s metal. Three old friends and former bandmates from their hair metal days* along with a girl who isn’t exactly what she seems, stumble into some wicked business after taking a wrong turn on the way to WrestleMania and all hell breaks loose (literally). Howe and Newman have crafted themselves one of the most brutal books a person can laugh at with this one.

Click here if you dare

Slug Bait – Tom Liens – Dirty Books

Straight forward and brutal crime fiction that puts you in a headlock and starts punching. Watching Rey, kind of a private eye but mostly just a bad-ass, pound his way through a collection of thugs, corrupt cops, and serial killers is damn good fun.

Find it here

Last Years Man – Paul D, Brazil – All Due Respect

When aging hitman Bennet runs into trouble in London he heads back to his hometown where everything goes great. Actually no, he runs into more trouble, a lot of it. Another hard hitting quick read filled with sharp dialog and a dash of dark humor (do you see a theme here?).

Get it here.

Deadlines – A tribute to Willian E. WallaceAll Due Respect and Down and Out Books

Normally for these lists, we leave out our own books and writers, we made a little bit of an exception here. Todd Morr is in this one but he only accounts for like four percent, which for the purpose of this we’ll pretend doesn’t exist. Bill Wallace was a great writer and though we didn’t know him as well as we would have liked he was a great dude as well. He was a huge supporter of the Indie crime scene so it makes sense the indie crime scene would step up for him. Chris Rhatigan and Ron Earl Phillips edited this collection of twenty-three top crime fiction writers and Todd Morr. Some took inspiration from Bill’s newspaper career and others just wrote the kind of dark pulp stories Bill tirelessly championed. Some stories are better than others but over 23 stories* every one manages to kick some serious ass, just like Bill would have wanted.
You know what to do

As always if the winners can find Todd Morr* he will buy them a beer or maybe even two*.

If you like our picks there’s a good chance you’ll like our books. You can find them all here

Supernatural Noir A Go Go!

David Nemeth, Dee Arr, drunk on the moon, Graham Wynd, Halloween, Music, noir, Noirvember, Paul D Brazill, Reviews, Roman Dalton, Short Story, Supernatural Noir, Toe Six Press, Tom Waits, Vic Godard

Supernatural NoirWell, Supernatural Noir was published a couple of days ago on Halloween and it’s all happening!

Graham Wynd kicks off #Noirvember with a look at Supernatural Noir and says:

‘I didn’t even know how much I missed Roman Dalton, his werewolf detective, until I started reading through the stories again. Netflix ought to swoop in and bag those stories for a new series.’

Meanwhile, over at Unlawful Acts, David Nemeth says:

‘If you like reading Brazill–and who doesn’t–, you should give this short story collection a twirl because it’s Brazill and there are zombies. Oh yeah, get it because it’s going for a little over a buck.’

Dee Arr at Amazon.com says:

‘This is crime noir with a bite (my apologies to all vampire and werewolf fans), and the combination of Mr. Brazill’s talents hooked me. Riveted, I finished the rest of the book in one sitting, never noticing the day arrive while my coffee grew colder.’

And I’m over at Toe Six Press sharing the Supernatural Noir playlist:

Supernatural Noir is collection of my short stories that I consider to be both supernatural and, er, noir. And of course, there’s music all over the place!

Drunk On The Moon by Tom Waits

It started with a song. Tom Waits’ Drunk On The Moon, to be precise. A neon soaked torch song with more than a twist of noir. A song of the city at night, sung by a man who sounded like a wolf- and not just Howlin’ Wolf. And once upon a time, there was a magazine named Dark Valentine who were looking for cross genre short stories. So, I wrote a yarn about a werewolf private eye. And I called it Drunk On The Moon.’

Read the rest here.